The Future Workforce – 8 Ways Today’s Crisis Will Change It

This year’s pandemic has created a universal shift and a subsequent ripple effect into relationships, education, technology, and importantly, the workforce.

The way we operate will forever change as the world transitions back to “normal”. The biggest changes will arguably affect the future of the workforce, Gen Z (those born after 1998). As they begin to enter the workforce, Gen Zers face challenges like no other generation before them, which will inevitably guide their decision making, behaviors and expectations. Just like 9/11 changed travel forever, this pandemic will change the workforce forever in eight major ways:

  1. Deeper dependence on technology. The world has made a dramatic shift from physical workspaces and in-person interactions to digital platforms and at-home workspaces. The new demand for technology, coupled with the technological-intelligence of Gen Z, will escalate the dependence on new technology in the workplace.
  2. Unconventional educational backgrounds. Over 290 million students around the world are impacted by school closures. Over 62 percent of students themselves report they would choose no college degree and unlimited internet access over a college degree and no internet access. Employers adapt as 90 percent say they are more open to accepting candidates without a four-year college degree. The value on higher education could erode for students, parents and employers as we know it.
  3. Entering careers sooner. There are more alternatives to a college education available now than ever before. Online certifications, digital portfolios and nano-degrees provide alternative learning and development. In fact, 62 percent of Gen Z report they are open to the idea of entering the workforce before completing a college degree.
  4. Enhanced value of learning and development. While Gen Z enters the workforce sooner, this will inevitably place emphasis on the employer to provide the necessary training for hard and soft skills. Employers who deliver learning that Gen Z uses, enjoys and applies will have the advantage.
  5. Revised view of employers. With remote working on the rise, work and life have fully merged. It’s becoming more difficult for Gen Z to distinguish where work stops, and life starts. Expect Gen Z to adapt by viewing employers as a means of support, wellness and education.
  6. Uncommon career paths. Gen Z workers are losing more work hours than any other demographic as 29 percent of Gen Z works have been put on leave. Given these numbers, Gen Z will experience diversification of income and participate more in gig jobs. As gig work becomes more accessible and lucrative, expect uncommon careers to be the future.
  7. Demand for emotionally intelligent leaders. Gen Z is the most anxious, stressed and lonely generation. After this time of uncertainty passes, Gen Z will look to their leaders for connection, assurance, and empathy delivered by emotionally intelligent leaders.
  8. Greater global unity. Not only is Gen Z more connected globally than any other generation, but they are also now experiencing a global health crisis. The number of Gen Zers who identify as a global citizen is likely to rise. The workforce will demand more diversity and inclusion from future leaders and employers.

Repurposed From entrepreneur.com

The measure of intelligence is the ability to change” – Albert Einstein